Red Thread Sisters

red thread sisters

Hi Guys, Aidan here with a new book recommendation.

I was at Lissy’s house when I saw this book. She had just finished reading it and although it has a picture of two girls on the front she said I should read it and that I’d enjoy it. She was right.

The book is about an eleven-year-old Chinese girl named Wen who is adopted by an American family. Before leaving the orphanage Wen promises her best friend, Shu Ling, she will find her a home in America too. Of course, that’s not as easy as Wen might think.

One of the most heartbreaking parts of the book is Wen believing if she’s not well behaved her parents will send her back to her orphanage. When her father loses his job and they have to cut back on extras, Wen thinks the of herself as an extra and prepares to return to China.

Wen also finds it hard to attach to her new family, especially her mother. The guilt she feels over leaving Shu Ling behind makes it difficult to even make new friends.

Having two cousins who were adopted from China made this book even more special to me. The book really made me think about a lot of things I take for granted. From major things like knowing my parents love me and would never give me up, to more minor things like knowing presents I get are mine and won’t be given to other people. Seeing American culture through the eyes of someone new to our shores is also really interesting.

I highly recommend this book by Carol Antoinette Peacock to anyone interested in learning more about orphanages and China, but also those who enjoy books about friendship, love and trust.

http://www.carolpeacock.com/

http://www.amazon.com/Thread-Sisters-Carol-Antoinette-Peacock/dp/0670013862/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1457444780&sr=8-1&keywords=red+thread+sisters

Texas Bluebonnet List 2016-2017

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Hi Guys, Aidan here!

Do you remember how much I raved about Echo earlier this year? Well, I just found out it made the Texas Bluebonnet list for 2016-2017. Congratulations to Pam Munoz Ryan and also to Austin writer, Chris Barton and illustrator, Don Tate, for their picture book, The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch, a fabulous book for younger readers.

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Echo!

EchoHey, guys! Aidan here. Lissy asked me to write a book review for a story I recently read: Echo By Pam Muñoz Ryan. I’ve read it – and it’s really cool! Sure, it’s a big book, but it has vivid characters and nice classical pieces, like Rhapsody in Blue (my aunt loves that piece). Set in World War II in Germany and America, the book follows Frederick, Mike, Ivy and a harmonica through different and difficult periods of history. I read it for my summer reading project, and it was perfect! I recommend it to those that have those kind of projects, once you start reading this- you can’t stop! Well, that’s all from me. Bye!

Summer Book Recommendations – Chained

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Hi guys, Aidan here with the first of my summer reading recommendations.

Chained, sounds like it might be sad, especially when you see the picture of a young Indian boy standing by a small elephant on the cover, but it is a book about friendship, courage, kindness and not giving up.

We are introduced to ten-year-old Hastin when his sister is sick and his mother is forced to work for a family that is unkind to her. To free his mother Hastin takes a job far from his family as an elephant keeper.

I felt the author did a good job of bringing both the marketplace and the jungle to life and really liked the way she gave descriptions an Indian twist, like “it feels like a python is squeezing my chest” and “she grows smaller and smaller, her face just a dot of cinnamon.”

I also liked that the author gives you lots of interesting information about elephants. While we were in India we learned a lot about elephants, including their teeth wearing down and also, of course, all about the tiger trade. I think it’s great that there are books like Ms. Kelly’s who help bring these issues to the attention of children and do so in an entertaining way.

There are some chapters that are hard to read, but the relationship between Hastin and Nandita and Hastin and Ne Min made me want to keep reading. In fact, I read the entire book in one day, it was that good.

If I had any criticism, it would be that I kept wondering if this was set now or in the past as it was hard to tell. I also wish I knew what part of India Hastin came from originally – a part that had desert and camels. However, I highly recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in India, or anyone who enjoys a story about a boy and his elephant.

http://www.amazon.com/Chained-Lynne-Kelly-ebook/dp/B007XSNB5S/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1434554333&sr=8-2&keywords=Chained&pebp=1434554341355&perid=0KNDWJGWVFT9409E2J8J

Top Ten Reasons Why Buying Books for Christmas Gifts is a Good Idea

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Hi Guys, Aidan here. The holidays are coming and I’m sure we are all giving serious thought on what to buy those loved ones on our shopping list. Here’s my top ten reasons why buying books as gifts for Christmas is a smart idea. Happy shopping everyone.

  1. It’s cheaper to send books through the mail than regular gifts.
  2. Books are easy to wrap.
  3. No one has to return a book because it’s the wrong size.
  4. Books smell good, plus they make you smart.
  5. No batteries required.
  6. Compared to other gifts, books are cheap.
  7. Books are easy to store.
  8. Books can be passed to others when you’re done.
  9. Books do not go out of fashion or have a use by date.
  10. You can get presents for everyone in just one store.

http://www.amazon.com/Operation-Tiger-Cousins-Action-Book-ebook/dp/B00OOIFNY2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1417793410&sr=8-1&keywords=operation+tiger+paw

The Wish List

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As you could probably tell from my post last month, I am REALLY into Eoin Colfer. So I was happy to discover that Mr. Colfer had written other books, including The Wish List. Okay, it is NOT Artemis Fowl, but it is GOOD. Here’s what happens.

Meg Finn is not really bad, she just acts that way. And she’s acting that way when she decides to break into pensioner Lowrie McCall’s apartment with local bad boy, Belch. Things quickly go horribly wrong when, after a freak accident, she finds herself flying down a passageway with two options at the end – heaven or hell.

But Meg is a conundrum – turns out she’s exactly 50% good and 50% bad – unheard of. And, before she knows it, Meg returns to earth in the form of a petulant teenage spirit, sent to help the man she has wronged.

Meg and Lowrie embark on a quest, a wish list, for the dying man. The question is, will they be able to finish it before time runs out?

Definitely worth the read, I’d say Mr. Colfer has done it again.

Artemis Fowl – Criminal Mastermind!

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Hi Folks, Aidan here.

I think I may have mentioned that I love my local library and I love them even more for recommending the Artemis Fowl series by Mr. Eoin Colfer (pronounced Owen) which I started at the beginning of the summer and have barely put down.

The Fowl books are an adventure series with a twist. First meet twelve year old Artemis Fowl II (teenage criminal mastermind) and his six foot plus Eurasian bodyguard, Butler. Second, meet Holly Short of the LEPrecon, Foaly the centaur and my favorite character, Mulch Diggums – a kleptomaniac dwarf with a really bad, erm, flatulence problem. Then throw them all together in a series of high-stakes adventures both around the world and under it.

While I was reading the books I Googled some of the reviews. Amazon says  – “You will never think of leprechauns the same way again. Rip roaring, 21st century romp of the highest order.” And I have to say, I agree. Another review said “Think of Die Hard, but with fairies.” Couldn’t have said it better myself.

Basically, if you like twelve year old masterminds and fairies with quick wit and a tendency towards sarcasm – run, don’t walk to your nearest bookstore or library and pick up the Artemis Fowl series. I guarantee you won’t regret it.

Drawings by Tess.